About your Search

20130106
20130114
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
made the masters work on religion and i looked at traditional societies. what lessons did you learn about the role of spirituality in the societies we might be missing? >> religion has different functions in traditional societies. from the function that it functions that it has in modern society. traditional societies use religion a lot more explanation, now science provided the explanations of why there's tides and why the sun seems to go across the sky. so there's a function of religion that has become lost with time. religion still has its function of offering comfort, of helping deal with anxiety. religion used to have a function of teaching us to obey the king or obey the president. the reasons that we obey the president today are not because of religion but because of the rule of law. >> interesting. professor jared diamond, thank you so much for all of that. >> you are welcome. >>> and up next, coughing, sneezing and wheezing. the flu outbreak infecting the nation. >> excuse me. >> how facebook -- well timed there, s.e. facebook helping some fight back. we'll explain it next.
. host: democratic caller. caller: republicans always find their religion when measures are needed that do not affect areas that are concerned by them. when katrina relief was needed, the federal debt and deficit was ballooning, and we did not see anybody spending up there, and we needed of since 36 offsets all the way up until the president got into -- needed offsets' until this president got into office. everything was already in place under republican-led spending, but now they have found religion and want to cut these programs said affect people that did not cause the economic downturn or the ballooning of the debt. they always find religion what it does not affect them. guest: let me just be clear that the club for growth has had a clear position on this. we are accused of being uncarin g let it comes to disaster relief, and it is not fair, because we want people to get the relief they need to love but we believe it should be paid for. the government should set money aside for emergencies. we can predict there will be emergencies every year. history has done that they will hel
of freedom of religion and separation of church and state. >> roger williams was the founder of rhode island, the founder of providence, and also a founder of the first baptist church in america. williams was going -- born in london. his birth records were burned up in the great london fire of 1666. he became a chaplain for one of the chiefs. because he was a puritan and the church was cracking down and putting his people in jail, he fled england. he arrived in boston in february. he believed the state had no role to play in religion. this was an absolutely radical idea at his time. every country in europe had a state church, so did massachusetts and the plymouth colony. they all had their own state- supported churches. the taxes of the people paid for the ministers and the buildings. you had to go to church or they would come and get you and fine you. williams said the state has no role whatsoever to play in religion. eventually, he was put on trial there and convicted of sedition and heresy and was going to be shipped back to england where he probably would have died. before they could exe
in a democracy and say, now we will fix the problems. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic clans are all part of that. you work with the system. i talked about alliances. that is what alliances are important. you work with in those systems. to influence change, affect change. there's so many things going on in the world today that are disgusting, despicable, that we hate. sudan is a good example. we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping change that, people who want to change it. we have limitations. all powers, all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand ho. host: chuck hagel. then-senator barack obama and chuck hagel traveling to the middle east. hagel co talks about the limits of power. guest: one of the conditions that president obama and his team said, a lot of demands and expectations around the world. a lot of challenges. america's role is to not challenge the foes, but to be dependable for the allies. i think one of the real challenges is when you think strategically. when you h
, i think for a lot of people in prison, finding some kind of religion is a way for solace and for community building in the prisons, and so there, you know, there is -- there's sometimes a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, and that's why the aclu's litigated to protect the religious rights of prisoners, religious access, access to places to worship and things like that because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people finding that kind of community. one more question? >> i heard that aclu, housing people in prison, but what about people who have been through the prison, and, perhaps it's witnessing conduct, and what's, you know, what is the goal? there's conviction to read, and there's the other thing with the charge, and -- >> we do a lot of work on police reform. affiliates, especially, work on excessive use of force cases. they work on racial profiling matters. we run the gamet on police reform. we are sometimes working collaboration with police departments to reform their policies and practices and training, and so we do a lot
to and resort to their private matters, based on their ritual, that prescribe to their beliefs and religion. >> one of your advisers, speaking of egyptian jews, caused controversy the other day, when he suggested that egyptian jews living in israel should come back to egypt. >> translator: these words were said in a specific context, and the one who said it said it in this way to demonstrate what he wanted to say from his point of view. but there are many media outlets that removed it from the general context. however, he is no longer an adviser to me, because now he is a member of the legislative counsel in the shirra council and hes most likely a leader in this council, and it is not right to group the legislative council and the executive council together in this stage, because he is not my adviser now. cnn correspondent ian lee has been in egypt for several years and speaks arabic. he says there are serious divisions within the country. so talk about those divisions. >> well, on one side, you have the opposition, which in the past, has been unorganized. at this time, against present, th
governments. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic, are all part of that. i talked about alliances. that is why alliances are important. you work within those systems. to effect change and influence change. there are some things going on in the world today that are disgusting, that are despicable, that we hate. but we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping the people who want to change it. we have limitations. and great powers run into very difficult times when they do not recognize that they too have limitations to their power. all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand this. host: as senator chuck hagel, in his speech, and two years ago -- as you hear the words he talks about the limits of power. that echoed what the president said that in 2008 when he was running for the white house. guest: i think that is right. i think one of the conditions that president obama and his team -- a lot of demands and expectations of rumba world and a lot of challenges. america's role is not just to k
people here in washington, but the treasury secretary nominee has an extra challenge. his religion. he talked about that with cnn's candy crowley back in 2011, when he was director of the office of management and budget. >> you are an orthodox jew, which means that you can't use electrical devices, over the weekend, friday night sundown to saturday. how does that work in a 24/7 job? have you ever had to cheat? >> well, it's actually not cheating. if there's a matter of real urgency, it is totally consistent with my religious beliefs to do whatever i need to do to deal with it. the hard part is making that judgment of what's an emergency and what's not. what's really serious. and frankly, the hardest part is saying to yourself, that it won't change the outcome if i'm not involved. and i've found that there's an enormous amount of respect, has been from the time i was very young, working for speaker o'neil, from working for two presidents, to taking things that are of real importance seriously. and when the phone rings on saturday, i don't have to wonder whether i need to pick it pup the
liberalism from liberals and religion from the religious. extremist-dominated debate where most people who are involved, who own guns, who might use them for sporting purposes aren't in favor of these assault weapons. they're not -- these things are made, these high-capacity magazines, these weapons, are made to simulate a kind of military-style engagement. here's my suggestion. anyone who wants to do that should volunteer to go join the military. >> ask wes moore about that. >> yeah. and go deal with that. so it's time for moderate people -- i own guns. it's time for people like me who own guns, who think that -- but think that the extremists have gone too far to actually take a stand on it. the second point -- and chris christie was making this point yesterday -- is it's not just about guns. and this goes to your question. it's about violence. and it's about the video games. and it's about culture. and that's not a bill. that's not a piece of legislation. it's a broad hour-to-hour household-to-household battle that requires parents, teachers, everyone to be engaged. and i think being eng
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)